Trip to River Raft near Moab, UT

Trip to Moab for River Rafting Adventure

TFL motto #3 “Out of our comfort zones but not overwhelmed.”

What a trip!!

Moab and the Colorado River are always a great mix.

We rafted on some pretty calm stretches for three days, with some fun rapids along the way.

It was hot and cool and beautiful.

It is so important for our students to do new and uncomfortable things, even if they never do that specific activity or trip again.

It comes down to brain activity and neuro-pathways.

If the brain can get used to building new pathways that are uncomfortable, different, and even a little anxiety causing, the brain can also learn to get out of comfort zones in other scary ways as well.

After doing some rapids and sleeping outdoors, it is a little easier to travel and interview for a job.

 

Don’t tell the students, but it was really nice to unplug for a few days and just enjoy each other and nature- it heals the soul and lifts the heart.

Doing hard things fits into what we all need to make it into successful adulthood and responsibility.

It builds confidence in ways no amount of talk therapy can do and gives tangible substance for our brains to believe that we are good enough.

Telling ourselves we are worthwhile just doesn’t carry the same weight as doing effective and functional things.

With confidence comes loss… doubt, fear, anxiety, depression and others.

Our students were pushed and they all did really well.

And I’m sure new neuro-pathways were formed:)

—Jason, TFL Executive Director

javascript at code school

JavaScript Frame Works and Projects at Code School

We finished code school a few weeks ago, and it was a great experience for me.

We learned a JavaScript frame work called Vue and a design frame work that works with it called Vuetify.

The knowledge I gained from my experience there was very beneficial to me.

Me and my partner, Richard Timpson, worked on a web based winery application that lists all of the wineries in North America.

I worked on things like searching, filtering, and layout, while he worked on backed routing and controllers to pull the data we had.

All in all, code school was a great success for me,

I learned loads of valuable information and because of completing code school,

I may be able to test out of some web design classes at Dixie this upcoming semester.

—Reid, TFL Student

I worked on a team to develop a web application that dynamically calculates safety stock based on demand history, lead time history, and desired service level.

I translated the math into JavaScript, created the server/database, created an API, and styled most of the user interface.

—Joseph, TFL Student

 

Intense Code School bootcamp

Intense Code School Bootcamp at Dixie State University

We’ve been powering through the intense Code School bootcamp at the Dixie State campus.

Code School was designed to help the participants get a job in the web design industry.

We’re going over a javascript framework called “Vue” that is getting more and more popular by the day.

I’m confident in what I’ve learned so far, and I’m excited to start on our final project this Friday.

Code School has been a great experience, and has helped me understand the industry standard for today’s web based programs.

—Reid, TFL Student

teach-ability

Teach-ability- Quality of a True Leader

I’m really liking the idea that teach-ability is a quality of a true leader.

I’ve noticed that those students who exhibit a desire to learn and a willingness to seek and respond to suggestions from others really accelerate the rate at which they improve.

I think this is important in any position, but it seems to be especially important in a mentoring position.

Mentors need to be pros at seeking and responding to feedback.

We need to be able to seek it from our employers and supervisors, as well as from our mentees.

Making this behavior a part of ourselves truly creates real leadership.
— Cam, TFL Mentor

Experience Kanarra Creek

Experience Kanarra Creek Through Our Student’s Eyes

Kanarra creek is an invitation to witness the wonders of creation.

Carved into the red rock of the desert mesa, one cannot help but intuit they stand in the narrow aisle of a vast house of worship.

Beneath your feet run the baptismal waters of the creek itself, above your head for tens of feet is the twisting walls of the canyon, carved into creamy undulations and myriad pockets, dips, nooks, and crannies.

All around you are parishioners of every shape and size.

Humans from all over flock to hear the water’s gospel, and trees hand out green pamphlets that tickle as you walk past the crowds of shade trees.

If can approach with an open heart and open mind it’s not just a short day hike, it’s an experience.

— Grady, TFL Student

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Good laughs at Sand Hallow Reservoir

Had Some Good Laughs at Sand Hallow Reservoir

During our trip to Sand Hollow Reservoir,

I felt the first real connection with my new Techie For Life family, and it made me proud to be a part of TFL.

We brought Roo (TFL’s emotional support dog) along, and he seemed to be having a blast, although he shivered a lot.

Cam helped some people move a giant inflatable flamingo across the reservoir.

We had some good laughs, and I feel like everyone seemed a bit more themselves than I had previously seen.

I like to think everyone else got to know me a little bit better as a result.

I definitely felt like I got to know Joseph better after we drove back.

—Astrid, TFL Student