javascript at code school

JavaScript Frame Works and Projects at Code School

We finished code school a few weeks ago, and it was a great experience for me.

We learned a JavaScript frame work called Vue and a design frame work that works with it called Vuetify.

The knowledge I gained from my experience there was very beneficial to me.

Me and my partner, Richard Timpson, worked on a web based winery application that lists all of the wineries in North America.

I worked on things like searching, filtering, and layout, while he worked on backed routing and controllers to pull the data we had.

All in all, code school was a great success for me,

I learned loads of valuable information and because of completing code school,

I may be able to test out of some web design classes at Dixie this upcoming semester.

—Reid, TFL Student

I worked on a team to develop a web application that dynamically calculates safety stock based on demand history, lead time history, and desired service level.

I translated the math into JavaScript, created the server/database, created an API, and styled most of the user interface.

—Joseph, TFL Student

 

graduating

Graduating- Students Advancement Ceremony

We had an amazing certificate and advancement ceremony for five graduating students.

Amber, Dylan, Dallin, Eric and Lee all have moved on to great things!

We are so proud of their progress, work and successes.

Each have created a successful path forward and are rocking it!

We will miss them and hope they will come back to visit often.

We never know when a student starts where they will land; finding themselves and working through roadblocks leads often to new paths and possibilities.

We have tried to ensure that each student finds their landing place as a destination school more than a transition school.

Congrats to our students and supporters who have all worked so hard!

—Jason, TFL Executive Director

TFL Students Tour Local Tech Companies

 

We toured two local companies; InfoWest and MetaShield.

InfoWest is a pretty sweet company, the atmosphere there was friendly and relaxed.

We got to see their help desk room as well as their server room.

Anyone with a background in Information Technology would agree that they feel at home when entering their help desk room.

MetaShield is a company that creates advanced coatings for materials like glass.

We got to see their chemistry room where “all the magic happens.”

We also got to see their highly advanced, scientific, machinery that’s used to measure various different properties of whatever coating they’re testing.

—Reid, TFL Student

Confirmation bias

Life Skills Class: Confirmation Bias

How can understanding confirmation bias be useful?

Confirmation bias is the tendency to interpret new evidence as supportive of one’s existing beliefs or opinions.

Most of us do not go around trying to prove ourselves wrong.

It feels terrible to be proven wrong.

If feels great to be right.

We get to feel… smart, confirmed and in control.

Facts don’t necessarily change our brain’s confirmation bias.

The only thing that changes confirmation bias is something so glaring that we are willing to believe it and feel terrible about it, long enough to change our beliefs or opinions.

Most of the time our brains would rather be efficient and keep believing the same beliefs.

Even if those beliefs themselves feel terrible.

Confirmation bias is great when prior conclusions are terrific.

If we believe we’re awesome our brains find evidence for why we’re so awesome.

Confirmation bias is not great when prior conclusions are terrible.

If we believe we’re a failure, then our brains find evidence and even make-up stories about what we do or don’t do to prove why we’re a failure.

The process of changing our belief systems to support us in being more successful takes effort.

Unfortunately, it doesn’t feel good, but new focused thoughts over time can become our new belief systems.

Then confirmation bias works in our favor to confirm our new helpful beliefs.

Hiking at Snow Canyon Lava Tubes

Hiking in Snow Canyon’s Lava Tubes With Flashlights

In a place called Snow Canyon, near St George, there is a really cool hike that takes you to some lava
tubes.

This is the hike we went on at some point in March.

The tubes are set into the ground(of course) and go pretty deep into the earth.

If you want to explore them, you do need a flashlight and a good sense of where you are because,

according to some people, they go in all sorts of directions.

I don’t really  if that is true, but it keeps me from hiking too deep into the caves formed by the tubes.

–Lee, TFL student

Learning marketable tech skills

Tech Class Update- Tailoring Learning Tracks for Optimal Learning and Engagement

Last week we started learning about databases and how to get started using the most popular open source database, MySQL.

Each student is also well into their personal development tracks for optimal learning and engagement.

Students are working on all sorts of things from javascript browser games to polishing up design portfolios.

I’ve also had the chance to continue to meet with each student one on one and go over how they are doing,

setting goals with them and tailoring their learning track to something they find engaging

while still developing marketable tech skills.

–Erik, TFL Tech Coach